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[Sticky] The Show and Tell Thread  

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(@erin)
Admin Admin

This is an image sharing forum with a twist...you may share any landscape photograph that you want, so long as you "tell" in addition. The idea of "telling" is similar to the Masters Forum: Share something that might help other photographers. What did it take to realize this photograph? Did you learn something in the process? What advice do you have for someone who might be interested in going the direction that your photograph does?

Post your photo and "tell" below. Photos posted without any "telling" will be deleted, so be sure to share something about your photo that might be helpful to others.

Quote
Posted : May 19, 2017 00:09
(@alex-wesche)
Eminent Member

Ok, I'll try to go first. I'm not sure if this is what you had in mind, because I don't feel that I did anything special to take this image...

20140606 DSC02448 Kopie

This photo was taken in the Brecon Beacons area in Wales. What really struck me in that region, was the seemingly untouched nature and the primeval atmosphere.
It's a feeling of wildness and freedom that I appreciate most, when I'm alone with uncontrollable elements like water and wind. 

I wanted to express that in this photo. I used a very long exposure of 30 seconds. In this case I didn't primarily use that to get smooth water, but to make the grass and trees go wild. I also used the greenery as a frame for this photo to increase the feeling of immersion in the moment, of being drawn into the picture.

I haven't shared this photo before, so I'm not sure it will have the same effect on other people that it still has on me. 

Lately there has been an increasing number of articles, blog posts and books that are concerned with vision in photography. Reading these, I always felt that I must be missing something, because when I'm outside taking photos I'm usually not aware of these kind of things. I do not plan a certain image in advance and Ansel Adams' previsualisation techniques don't really work for me mostly.

I do however always remember how I felt when I took a photo and when I sort through them for editing later, I realise why I chose a certain approach. When taking the photo I just do what feels right to me at the moment.

ReplyQuote
Posted : May 19, 2017 11:42
Joerg liked
(@erin)
Admin Admin

What a great start to the thread! And also a great choice to use a long exposure on your photo from Wales. I’m loving the energy in the foliage moving around everywhere.

 

As for vision and pre-visualization, that’s one of my favorite topics, and I’ve had a lot to say about it in articles, talks, interviews, etc. I think that the way it tends to work is in phases, usually starting with something very vague, like an act of curiosity or experimentation. Although those sudden eureka moments do happen, I usually go through a gradual evolution of ideas to reach the point where the vision for a photo feels pretty clear in my mind before making it. And sometimes it’s not until I’m in the process of culling and editing that realize what I’ve got, which moment to choose, and how I want to develop it.

 

Thanks for getting this thread off the ground, Alex!

ReplyQuote
Posted : May 19, 2017 16:20
(@mkirste)
Member

2016 USA Southwest 6018 Kopie (1)

In 2016, I did my first trip to Colorado photographing the beautiful fall color. The first day I was shooting at Kebler Pass and then head down to Crested Butte. In the valley you can find beautiful stands of aspen trees.

I have seen and analyzed many photos from this sport before. First, I planned a shot in the evening with backlight during the twilight hour. During this time of year the white aspens tree trunks and yellow leaves would glow in the darker landscape. However, I was not successful due to bad weather and low clouds.

 

Thus, I returned the next morning. I knew the sun would directly set up in front of me. I carefully chose a composition where I have some aspen on the left and the right side of the image and where you can see the river in the valley. Just when the sun rises I took multiple exposure due to the high dynamic range. In fact, the foreground bushes are taken just after the sun has risen, and the trees are from a photo one minute later when the sunbeams got further down the valley. Due to the backlight, the leaves of the aspen trees glow and make a good contrast to the valley which is still in shadow. 

the "unsuccessful" attempt the evening before

2016 USA Southwest 5823 Kopie
ReplyQuote
Posted : May 20, 2017 02:50
(@alex-wesche)
Eminent Member
Posted by: Erin Babnik

 

What a great start to the thread! And also a great choice to use a long exposure on your photo from Wales. I’m loving the energy in the foliage moving around everywhere.

 

As for vision and pre-visualization, that’s one of my favorite topics, and I’ve had a lot to say about it in articles, talks, interviews, etc. I think that the way it tends to work is in phases, usually starting with something very vague, like an act of curiosity or experimentation. Although those sudden eureka moments do happen, I usually go through a gradual evolution of ideas to reach the point where the vision for a photo feels pretty clear in my mind before making it. And sometimes it’s not until I’m in the process of culling and editing that realize what I’ve got, which moment to choose, and how I want to develop it.

 

Thanks for getting this thread off the ground, Alex!

   

Thank Erin, I'm glad you think so. 

Also your comment on vision makes the topic a bit more comprehensible to me 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : May 20, 2017 06:26
(@alex-wesche)
Eminent Member
Posted by: mkirste

 

2016 USA Southwest 6018 Kopie (1)

In 2016, I did my first trip to Colorado photographing the beautiful fall color. The first day I was shooting at Kebler Pass and then head down to Crested Butte. In the valley you can find beautiful stands of aspen trees.

I have seen and analyzed many photos from this sport before. First, I planned a shot in the evening with backlight during the twilight hour. During this time of year the white aspens tree trunks and yellow leaves would glow in the darker landscape. However, I was not successful due to bad weather and low clouds.

 

Thus, I returned the next morning. I knew the sun would directly set up in front of me. I carefully chose a composition where I have some aspen on the left and the right side of the image and where you can see the river in the valley. Just when the sun rises I took multiple exposure due to the high dynamic range. In fact, the foreground bushes are taken just after the sun has risen, and the trees are from a photo one minute later when the sunbeams got further down the valley. Due to the backlight, the leaves of the aspen trees glow and make a good contrast to the valley which is still in shadow. 

the "unsuccessful" attempt the evening before

2016 USA Southwest 5823 Kopie

   

That's a lovely view and the difference between moods is quite striking! 

Personally I prefer the "unsuccessful" version. The backlight from the sunrise is really nice, but these kind of moods are a bit like sweets for me. Too much of it isn't good 😉
I really like the sunrise version too, but I think I enjoy cloudy moods longer...

I played a bit with the cloudy version in Photoshop. I just love the way how colours look on cloudy days.
I hope I'm not being presumptuous... Let me know if you want me to remove it.

61 2016 USA Southwest 5823 Kopie
ReplyQuote
Posted : May 20, 2017 06:32
(@sairam6087)
Moderator Moderator

Thanks for sharing your images and thoughts, Alex and Michael! I love the moving greens in your image Alex. Really seems like a painting. Michael, I'm glad you got the sun to shine through in your image. Funnily enough, like Alex, I too prefer the cloudy precursor. I guess that's why photography is so amazing. We each have unique preferences and ideas for the same scenery.

ReplyQuote
Posted : May 20, 2017 08:10
(@ron-jansen)
Moderator Moderator

I thought I’d upload this image in the Show and Tell section because there’s quite some things to tell about it...

 DSC9364 65 as Smart Object 1 copy 1200 thinkoutside

When I planned my trip to Iceland I made sure to include a visit to an icecave in my itinerary and it was actually the first thing I booked after a plane ticket. When the day came however, heavy rain flooded the icecave and the tour got cancelled.
Very disappointed we had to come up with something else that afternoon. We decided to just continue on along the coast after Jökulsárlón and Höfn, we didn’t know anything about that area, since we did not plan to visit it due to time limitations. We would just see what would meet us there… It turned out that the area was amazing and sometimes you drive really close to the coast there, showing very dramatic lava cliffs being pounded by the waves, deserted black sand beaches and lava sea stacks and rocks. In between there were steep mountains, old farms and meadows. I would have loved to spend more time there… maybe next time… We pulled over at the beach shown here. The light was continuously changing due to the clouds and heavy wind. The waves were high and powerful when they crashed on the beach; I had to keep a good distance! Once in a while the sun would peek between the clouds and it illuminated the waves and the salt water sprays caused by them. I just had to catch that! But the sun would soon disappear completely behind those mountains… And at the same time the crashed waves should be on their way back, creating these nice lines on the black sand… I needed a longer exposure, so ND filters. I wanted to time my shooting precisely for the wave action, so I needed my remote. I quickly started collecting the items from my backpack. The transmitter of my wireless remote needed a new battery and in all excitement and haste I inserted it 180 degrees rotated… Smoke started rising immediately… it got fried! Great timing! (And… why? I had never seen this happen before…) Luckily I always have a small and cheap wired remote as backup with me. I quickly switched to that one and started taking exposures, in between cleaning the salt spray from my 3-stopper filter. When the sun was there the light was difficult to catch, but after several tries I ended up with this final image showing all the features of the scene that I wanted in it…

I was driving around disappointed that day and I wasn’t even supposed to be at this beach! But this is one of my personal favorites from that trip. So I’ll remember that when unexpected things happen, just keep going, let’s see what happens, be flexible and try to forget your disappointment. Make the best of it, you never know what might happen.  Next time, I want to have sort of a plan again, but just as a guideline, I don’t have to follow it. Keep an open mind and see what you’ll find. Look around you.

I even did manage to join another icecave trip the next day! That cave was closed before, due to an avalanche, but the rainfall flushed the entrance clean! And back home I contacted Hähnel in Ireland about my wireless remote and they replaced the whole transmitter without problems. 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 5, 2017 07:03
(@jcarlos)
Member

The point of view of an amateur: landscape forever?

I'm glad to participate in this thread. The photographers inspiration is contagious. I'll share a quick story and an image. Recently I visited some friends near Monsaraz, in Alentejo, Portugal, where the sun is always shining and the sky is always blue, most of the year. I had done some research with Google maps and was hoping to find some abandoned houses made of stone and old bricks, close to the big lake Alqueva. But it didn't work: what seemed an abandoned house in Google maps was just a pile of stones. I was desperate: it was hard enough to find the location through that dense vegetation. First I gave up. But then I was there, I had to find an alternative. And I did, and it was not landscape: Monsaraz is a small village of white houses, narrow alleys and... shadows. There was my alternative, and I enjoyed walking those alleys searching for nice shadows on those white walls. This image is one example. I took more than 20 images, black and white, added some text, and made a book with Blurb. What seemed a failed coloured landscape adventure ended up as a black and white interesting experience.

monsaraz

   

ReplyQuote
Posted : October 31, 2017 04:22
(@jglaser757)
Member Customer

I took this image in 2013 while in Oregon on a workshop.

 

Jon Glaser 20130819 oregon 0172o

It sat on the hard drive for years until earlier this year. I have always kept every single file that comes out of my camera because ya never know when your gonna need something. I also tried processing this over and over again. Every time I tried, I ended up with something that was not right or looked forced. I have other images from that shoot

Jon Glaser 20130819 Tranquil and Still 0001 3o

 

Needless to say it sat there taking up space until earlier this year. While I took a year off from shooting I decided to cull my hard drive and start browsing for images to process. Thats when I came upon this file again. In years past,  I had taken many black and white classes with Vincent Versace  and have become very adept at Nik Silver efex.. So I started to tackle this image once more. I was bored, had no new files to process and nothing to do.

Jon Glaser Patterns in the Sand 1o 1

 Lesson I learned is that one must never ever discard files and if you cant figure it out, let it marinade on your hard drive for a couple years!!!!!!

It definitely works and have had some success with it this year..

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 4, 2017 20:16
(@alice-bell)
Member

Your tips inspire me, tell me you are making black and white photo? It seems to me interesting this direction of professional photography. https://fixthephoto.com/online-photoshop-editor.html

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Posted : June 25, 2020 09:56
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